German economy sees unexpected growth in third quarter

By AP News

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The German economy grew in the third quarter, an unexpectedly positive performance powered largely by private spending

BERLIN (AP) — The German economy grew in the third quarter, an unexpectedly positive performance powered largely by private spending, official figures showed Friday.

Gross domestic product in Europe’s biggest economy expanded by 0.3% in the July-September period compared with the previous quarter, the Federal Statistical Office said. That followed a slight increase of 0.1% in the second quarter.

“The German economy managed to hold its ground despite difficult framework conditions of the global economy, with the continuing COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain interruptions, rising prices and the war in Ukraine,” the statistics office said.

The government said earlier this month that GDP was believed to have shrunk in the third quarter and was expected to decline again in the last three months of the year as well as the first three months of 2023 before beginning to recover. Two consecutive quarters of negative growth is one technical definition of recession.

With energy prices high, Germany — like many other countries — is grappling with skyrocketing inflation, which hit 10% in September. On Tuesday, a survey showed German business confidence stuck at its lowest level in more than two years as energy worries fuel expectations of a difficult winter.

Lawmakers last week cleared the way for the government to provide up to 200 billion euros ($195 billion) in subsidies to households and businesses through 2024 to ease the strain of high energy prices. However, details of that plan haven't yet been finalized.

Officials say Germany is well-placed to get through the winter with sufficient energy after Russia cut off natural gas supplies but stress that it will still be necessary to conserve the fuel that heats homes, generates electricity and powers factories.

“Looking ahead, the surprise growth in the third quarter does not mean that the recession narrative has changed,” ING economist Carsten Brzeski said in a research note. “All leading indicators point to a further weakening of the economy in the fourth quarter and there doesn’t seem to be any improvement in sight.”

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Author: AP News

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Originally published by Associated Press Valuethemarkets.com, Digitonic Ltd (and our owners, directors, officers, managers, employees, affiliates, agents and assigns) are not responsible for the content or accuracy of this article. The information included in this article is based solely on information provided by the company or companies mentioned above.

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