Amazon subsidiary Zoox tests robotaxi

By AP News

Share:

A self-driving vehicle company owned by Amazon says it has successfully carried passengers on public roads

Zoox-Robotaxi

NEW YORK (AP) — Zoox, a self-driving vehicle company owned by Amazon, said it has successfully carried passengers on public roads - a development that helps the California company inch closer to bringing the vehicle to the general public.

The company conducted the first run of its four-person “robotaxi” with employees on board Saturday, the Amazon subsidiary said Monday.

The vehicle, which doesn’t have steering wheels or pedals, ran a mile-long route between two Zoox buildings at the company’s headquarters in Foster City, California. The carriage-style interior of the vehicle has two benches that face each other. It measures just under 12 feet long, about a foot shorter than a standard Mini Cooper and can travel up to 35 miles per hour.

Zoox, which was founded in 2014 and bought by Amazon six years later, said its vehicle can navigate roads and avoid collisions. Before Saturday's test, the company said it completed testing on private roads and got necessary approvals from California’s Department of Motor Vehicles.

With the test now completed, Zoox says its planning to launch a shuttle service exclusively for its employees.

Share:

In this article:

Industries:
Information Technology

Author: AP News

This article does not provide any financial advice and is not a recommendation to deal in any securities or product. Investments may fall in value and an investor may lose some or all of their investment. Past performance is not an indicator of future performance.

Originally published by Associated Press Valuethemarkets.com, Digitonic Ltd (and our owners, directors, officers, managers, employees, affiliates, agents and assigns) are not responsible for the content or accuracy of this article. The information included in this article is based solely on information provided by the company or companies mentioned above.

Sign up for Investing Intel Newsletter